Eduardo. A 22 y/o Salvadoran-Australian currently studying in Tokyo.

Install Theme

I tried to psyche myself up as much as I could for the culture shock when I arrived here but it still hit me like a truck when it did. That last post made me think about something a new friend had said earlier today about Japanese men in onsen (traditional communal bathhouses); They have absolutely no shame about their bodies, so many Westerners (including myself) feel really awkward getting naked in front of a bunch of guys but you quickly realise no one really cares. And I haven’t seen it for myself yet, but in the onsen you can apparently sometimes see dudes cleaning each other’s junk like its nothing. My friend said there’s a very very thin line between what’s gay and what isn’t here, but the moment you actually say the word ‘gay’ they all suddenly get very macho and offended. But it’s indeed true that much of Japan’s history is riddled with homosexual undertones. Shit’s just so different here, and it’s actually really straining trying to remember sometimes what can be considered appropriate and what can’t.

I respect this country so much for that, for being so stubbornly unique. Like yeah the Japanese dress in mostly Western clothes and Tokyo is just a sea of skyscrapers, but even walking through Shinjuku you see the odd kimono flicking through the breeze and clerks standing outside brand name stores like Chanel and H&M respectfully calling out ‘irrashaimase!’, beckoning customers to come in.

gaymanga:

Photographs from Otoko: Photo-Studies of the Young Japanese Male, 1972
by Tamotsu Yato (矢頭保)

In its 85 photographs, Otoko pushed the boundaries of public decency, established a new vocabulary for homoerotic art, and presented Japanese manhood in a way it had never quite been pictured before. Richard Hawkins has written a fascinating, detailed history of Tamotsu Yato’s life, where he characterizes Otoko as “almost legendary” and “quite formative for gay Japanese men of certain age.”

Before Yato started making waves as a photographer, he played bit parts in Nikkatsu Studio films, typecast as a gangster or a “streetwise tough.” These were the same type of rough-edged macho characters he was drawn to as a photographer. Yato found his subjects, many of them heterosexual, by approaching men on the street with his business card and asking, “Would you like to be my model?” 

Yato’s career in photography began in 1967 with the publication of Young Samurai: Bodybuilders of Japan, an unprecedented ode to muscled Japanese men which boasted a glowing introduction from the novelist Yukio MishimaMishima was a close friend and mentor to Yato. He wrote introductions to Yato’s books, inspired Yato’s aesthetic and appeared as a model throughout Yato’s work. The photographer and the author found a lot of common ground, sharing a love for masculinity and a mutual nostalgia for the the Japanese past, rife with all-male environments and romantic notions of honor, violence, and loyalty. In Otoko, Yato uses traditional Japanese symbols to root male-male desire within a historical context. Hawkins sums it up succinctly:

Yato’s careful inclusion of historical props (swords, helmets, fans, Meiji-era furnishings) is overtly intended toward homosexualizing Japanese history and historicizing Japanese homosexuality.

Just before Otoko’s originally intended release date in 1970, Yukio Mishima famously acted out ritual suicide (seppuku) in the midst of an attempted coup d’état. Yato dedicated Otoko to the memory of his departed friend. Without a major publisher or art gallery backing him up, Yato took an nontraditional approach to distributing the book. From Hawkins:

When Otoko was published in 1972, Yato brought copies of the book around to Shinjuku and offered it for sale in the increasing number of gay bars that Tokyo offered at this time. It was apparently for sale behind the counter at at least one bar, Paru (a bar which, as an aside, Roland Barthes frequented on his several trips to Tokyo in the late 60s). Yato charged two prices for the book; 1,500 yen for those who could afford it and 300 yen for students.

Yato passed away suddenly in 1973 of an enlarged heart. Otoko went on to become a cult phenomenon and profoundly impacted a generation of gay erotic artists, including the hugely influential Sadao Hasegawa. In his 1996 book Paradise Visions, Hasegawa explained the cultural significance of Otoko:

Tamotsu Yato achieved fame by creating Otoko, a picture book. He photographed Yukio Mishima, nude. His subjects: traditional, muscular, unsophisticated countryside men, are mostly extinct today. Otoko was valuable because you could see these long-bodied, stout-legged, cropped hair, square-jawed men… Good-bye, men of Nippon!

Gengoroh Tagame acknowledges the importance of Yato’s work in the introduction to his book Gay Erotic Art in Japan vol. 1, crediting Yato and photographer Kuro Haga with shaping the erotic aesthetic of a generation. He also laments the photographer’s fading legacy: 

As for Yato Tamotsu, the existence of the artist is nearly forgotten, and original negatives are spread and gone, there is no movement to evaluate him once again. This is very unfortunate not only for gay erotic art, but also for the history of Japanese photography. His work is highly artistic and timeless.

(hatethから)

I’m procrastinating showering and studying so like the piece of trash I am I decided to take selfies.

(元記事: jackanthonyfernandez (imani-n-ozから))

(元記事: retroanimu (cisnegrosから))

And like there’s this bunch of artsy photos/pictures on this notice board in my dorm and a couple are of two dudes kissing and I’m like WHAT IS THIS? What does it mean? Are you cool with this? Did you have queer dorm mates in the past? Is someone here gay? TELL ME

I’m probably going to nut after like a minute if/when I do eventually hook up here bc I’m truly suffering. No one knows about me yet, I’m still trying to suss everyone out and gauged that coming out to them will probably make everything really awkward, my apps won’t work and I’ve only wanked like twice since arriving bc roommate and very little privacy.

unexplained-events:

This is what nightmares are made of

pls

unexplained-events:

This is what nightmares are made of

pls

izotecipotx:

'Maca Mix | Izotecipotx | Cover credit
Pale Paleu- La Gran Banda | Honduras
La Cabaña- Los Rayos de Oriente | El Salvador
Tu Lu Lú- Palo de Mayo | Nicaragua 
Sopa de Caracol- Banda Blanca | Honduras
Sabrosa Cumbia- Marito Bravo y Su Grupo | El Salvador
El Cangrejo- Jaque Mate | Costa Rica
A Mover La Colita- Fidel Funes y su Orquesta con Francisco Paez [Malacates] basico3 REMIX | Guatemala
Bruckdown Melody- The Professionals | Belize 
La Cumbia- Tamboritos Mejoranas | Panamá

izotecipotx:

'Maca Mix | Izotecipotx | Cover credit

  1. Pale Paleu- La Gran Banda | Honduras
  2. La Cabaña- Los Rayos de Oriente | El Salvador
  3. Tu Lu Lú- Palo de Mayo | Nicaragua 
  4. Sopa de Caracol- Banda Blanca | Honduras
  5. Sabrosa Cumbia- Marito Bravo y Su Grupo | El Salvador
  6. El Cangrejo- Jaque Mate | Costa Rica
  7. A Mover La Colita- Fidel Funes y su Orquesta con Francisco Paez [Malacates] basico3 REMIX | Guatemala
  8. Bruckdown Melody- The Professionals | Belize 
  9. La Cumbia- Tamboritos Mejoranas | Panamá

(元記事: boipvssy (fillingthemeasureから))

foodthatlookslikeiggyazalea:

Iggy Azalea and the ‘denim chicken’ from it’s always sunny in philadelphia

foodthatlookslikeiggyazalea:

Iggy Azalea and the ‘denim chicken’ from it’s always sunny in philadelphia

(ruinedchildhoodから)

I love my skin!

(元記事: arthaemisia (pues-oseaから))

(元記事: nearlyvintage (rejillaから))

unhistorical:

Rink’s first celebration of his birthday in his adopted city of San Francisco took place on June 27th, 1969—and was interrupted by a phone call from a friend in Greenwich Village relating the Stonewall riots in real time. After getting caught up in the then-nascent LGBT political movement, Rink turned his focus to the rich fabric of queer social and political life, chronicling San Francisco’s seismic self-transformation into the queerest city in the world in the space of a decade. The great historical value of Rink’s work is the nearly day by day chronicling of that process of transformation, the gradual and occasionally violent birthing of the San Francisco we know today. 

Rink Foto

(fuckyeahqueerpeopleofcolorから)

romufromfrance:

Études pour planches anatomiques - Feutres Staedtler et collage de papier vinyl sur papier 125 grammes - 40X30 chacun - 2013

(hatethから)